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Residential Facility Design
Albany, New York
College of Saint Rose

architecture+ prepared a Conceptual Design for a new residence hall complex on their downtown Albany Campus. The proposed site, although part of the Campus, contains one and two-family homes that are currently used for student housing and administrative space. The new residential facilities proposed presented a strategic opportunity to create a physical and symbolic gateway to the Campus and allow for the creation of a new quad for student recreational use.

We developed the final design concept by exploring the key planning concepts of traditional neighborhood scale, urban corner, pedestrian and visual access, architectural integration, and service access. We explored and developed several site concepts with the College and produced various three dimensional model massing studies to insure that the project would integrate well with the neighborhood.

The buildings provide a total of 505 beds along with the supporting shared program elements. The residential component of the buildings includes 12-bed residential pods. Each pod consists of 6 double bedrooms and associated bathrooms clustered around a living area. Each of the living areas are open to the main corridor to allow for both intra-pod and extra-pod social interaction. A typical residential floor has four pods which allows the 48 residents of the floor to interact in any of the four floor living rooms.

The proposed design concept celebrates the pedestrian, neighborhood character of the Campus and is comprised of three, four-story residential buildings that have been designed and scaled to work with the neighboring buildings. The site features a corner park creating the physical, symbolic gateway to the Campus, a landscaped recreational quad, a central garden, and three pedestrian gateways to the Campus. Exterior entry porches, alternating bays, residentially scaled gable roofs, residential fenestration types, and tree-lined and landscaped walkways, all work together to provide a new urban residential streetscape and rhythm that encourages pedestrian comfort and enhances neighborhood character.

The human side of architecture