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Crispell Hall Interiors
New Paltz, New York
SUNY New Paltz

architecture+ designed the $9.7 million renovation of this 200 bed, 1960’s era residence hall. This project is the first in a series of residential construction projects that SUNY New Paltz is implementing as the result of their Residence Life Master Plan prepared by architecture+. Crispell Hall, with its bright entrances, elegant sloped metal roof, inviting elevator lobby, up to date finishes, and creative use of space, has established a new signature for Hasbrouck Quad.

The interior renovations improved livability, complied with the current building codes, and improved accessibility while maintaining the bed capacity. The use of modern finishes and the integration of study, computer, and recreational lounge spaces into the building evoke a hospitality setting. The repositioning of the elevator in proximity to the entrance allowed all floors of the building to be accessible. Wasted hallway space was captured into suites to allow for larger lounges and bathrooms within the suites.

The building exterior was completely transformed by the addition of a sloped metal roof to the existing flat roof. A new more welcoming entrance vestibule was introduced.

The architecture+ team completed design in six months. Our team worked closely with DASNY and the contractor to support the accelerated seven month construction phase. Construction was completed on time for a Fall 2010 occupation. The design incorporated many energy efficient and sustainable concepts. This project has received LEED Gold certification.

“This was a very ambitious project with extremely tight design and construction schedules. The staff from architecture+ acknowledged the complexity of the project and schedule, designed a project that fully met our expectations and worked diligently to insure that the final product was delivered on schedule and within budget. I look forward to future collaborations with the professionals at architecture+ as they fulfilled our campus expectations completely.”

John M. Shupe, Asst. Vice President for Facilities Management, SUNY New Paltz

The human side of architecture